Moving Abroad: How I Did It and Why You Can Too

Colliseum

There has been a lot of chit chat lately, especially after the recent elections, about people jokingly moving to another country. This, often times, is something that seems so far out of reach and not something most people actually pursue, unless they are moving for work or the military. Well believe it not, there is quite an impressive amount of expats living all over the world because they choose to.

In fact, being an expat in a major European city, like Rome, is not un-common. Expats make up about 6% of the total Italian population. Although, don’t confuse expat with the term immigrant, which is very different than an expat, and took me a while to realize. Although this is a debatable topic. Read more about this here.

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How My Life Has Changed Since Moving Abroad

LaCasabloga-Trastevere4-July 13

If anyone would have told me a year ago that I would be living in Italy, I would have never believed them. Fast forward to today, and now 3 weeks have gone by since Jared and I have arrived to Rome, yet it still hasn’t hit me that I am living in Italy and I certainly can’t believe we have been here for a whole 3 weeks already. Where does the time go??

It was a little over a year ago that Jared and I came to visit Europe for the first time, can you guess that we instantly fell in love with it here? From the language, to the food, the culture, architecture, it’s no wonder its the 5th most visited country in the world-Italy has everything you want and more.

We are currently living in Rome, the capital and largest city of Italy with the largest population. We got really lucky with our first apartment here. It’s in a perfect location close to the Vatican Museum so we can pretty much walk anywhere from here without any problems. Normally our day to day here consists of a morning workout, getting some work done on the computer, and then venturing out later in the evening. We try to avoid going out between the hours of 12-4 because of the intense heat, so we tend to wait for it to cool down some before leaving the house. It works out as most businesses are often closed at this time anyway, which can last from 90 minutes to two hours. This is called riposo in Italy.

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